Feeling Underpaid? Here’s how to ask for an appraisal!

Asking for an appraisal is never easy. It can be extremely rewarding but can backfire if the situation goes haywire. Asking for a raise is like giving the toughest competitive examination, except for the fact that you’re always unsure of the result. However, it’s completely natural to feel a bit anxious before you take this leap of faith. The question that comes to the mind of every underpaid employee is how to ask or when should you ask for a raise.

Unfortunately, most people don’t have the option to appraise themselves. In most cases, you have to contact an individual at a higher authority, one that’s levitating above the rest of us. Try to arrange an appointment so they can get back on the ground and establish communication with you. 

Make the research count

First, do your research and gather as many facts as possible. Cross-check them to strengthen your chances. If the facts are based on your performance or on the value you’ve added to the organization you work for, you might have hit the bullseye. Don’t throw a dart at your boss though. That’s being impolite. However, it might take some time to be in that position. How to work your way up to the top? Well, start from scratch. Build decent relationships with your colleagues and seniors. A good circle with reputed contacts in the workplace can go a long way.

Before we move along, ask yourself these questions. Have you searched about the market you’re working for? How’s the industry doing? How are the opportunities? What’s the average pay? This research goes hand in hand with the previous aspect. This might give you a reality check and help you to keep your expectations in check as well. It’s okay to dream big but it’s even more important to have a grasp on reality. It can be deceiving and it might take some time for you to realize that. The earlier, the merrier. Don’t go overboard with the figures you have in mind. 

Be deserving

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Have you completed any of the assignments or projects? If yes, how was your performance? This can go hand in hand with the “research and facts” point we discussed earlier. Try to emphasize the value you’ve added to the company. If you feel like you deserve a raise, ask for it. Be courteous about it and let your performance numbers do the talking. What’s the worst that could happen? A ‘no’? Don’t let that stop you. Let them know how you’re adding value to the organization and how you plan to take your performance to the next level. Future endeavors are just as important, if not more. 

What are the policies?

It’s also important to learn about your company’s appraisal policy. Most of the reputed organizations have a fixed system to request a raise. Study it before showing up at your boss’ doorstep, knocking every few seconds to no avail. Some companies have an ‘appraisal request’ scenario quarterly, some do it half-yearly, others do it annually. As it’s evident, it differs from organization to organization. Study about your specific company’s policies first. This will definitely make you seem professional. 

Now that you have discovered the tricks to preparing and asking for an appraisal, it’s time to take the next step and master the art of negotiation. Negotiating a pay rise is an art or skill that comes with the practice. Read our blog ‘The art of Salary Negotiation’ to learn all the insights!

If you fail, try again

Last but not least, if nothing goes as you planned, it might be a hint to start looking somewhere else! Talking of jobs, Vasitum should definitely be your go-to job search portal. We’re an AI-powered platform bridging the gap between you and the recruiter by smart job recommendations.

On the other hand, if you’re not looking for a different job, try to complete a project or assignment with flying colors to prove your worth. Be confident about it. It’s one of the most important parts of your personality. However, there’s a subtle difference between being confident and conceited. Mind the difference and you’ll be more than fine.