Job interview

Job interviews are scary and feeling nervous is natural, but for some people it’s worse than normal. The mere thought of being under scrutiny is nerve-wracking, and the worst part is that someone else (the recruiter) is in control. Although recruiters are intimidating and might scrutinize you based on your appearance, mannerism, and attitude rather than your resume, they’re not monsters. After all, they are humans, so there’s nothing too big to fear, but it doesn’t hurt to be on your toes.

They genuinely want the best for both the company and you; specifically in that order. Most recruiters want you to feel comfortable but at the same time, they are also aware of the power in their hands and do not refrain from being blatant about it when it comes to your future in the company, expectations from you, your salary package, and responsibilities.  

Remember you aren’t the only one in the hot seat; there have been many candidates before you and quite a few waiting in line. So, you need an edge.

#1 Find a common interest

Do a thorough background check on your interviewer. Look for their social media and observe their likes and interests, such as the coffee place they often check-in to, or a social cause they are close to. Regardless of how your interview started, you can always sway it the way you like. They’ll naturally remember you, thanks to your common interest.

#2 Think Twice Before You Speak

Avoid lying about your skills, past work experiences, or social network. Try to embrace your shortcomings as honestly as possible and try to show off how eager you are about learning and adapting. Also, while speaking, make sure you’re choosing the right words and try to use power words to come off as assertive. Try not to stammer or stutter, be clear with your voice, and speak loudly (don’t yell, though). 

 

Gentle reminder, do not ask any question you are not sure should be asked or not. Avoid asking questions on or around:

  • Anything Related to Salary or Benefits
  • How Often Reviews Occur
  • Is it okay to work from home
  • How many paid personal and/or sick days are allowe

#3 Observe and Follow Body Language

According to a research by Pew Research center, a person is often inclined towards people who emanate similar body language. Observe and try to mirror the same gestures; however do not try to overdo it. Once the interviewer notices a similar body language, it sets off a feeling that you two are on the same wavelength, even if you’re poles apart in real life. 

#4 Be Ready For Anything

Don’t be sure that the interviewer will be in the best of moods when interacting with you. They’re in the office and they’re going through their normal day which might not have been great. Be prepared for any questions and attitude thrown at you by the recruiter, especially rudeness. They go through tons of candidates daily and can sometimes come off as rude even when they don’t want to, for this you need how to deal with rude interviewers who behaves extremely unprofessionally:

  • Speak clearly and maintain a neutral stance on questions 
  • Do not side with any political, social, or religious organisation or institution
  • Be as courteous as possible when speaking
  • Answer only that which you’re asked, do not elaborate unless asked to
  • Start sentences with prefixes like “to be perfectly candid,” “to be honest,” or “frankly speaking”

#5 Think on Your Feet

Don’t get freaked out if the interviewer throws a situation at you. They’re just trying to gauge how capable you are about handling predicaments. So take your time, be and appear calm, and offer a solution. Even if it’s wrong, try to be more optimistic, propgressive and adaptive.

#6 Don’t forget to be amazing to anyone you meet

Right from the moment you arrive for the interview, with the interview or waiting down the hall, you’re being observed. The peon, front desk people, and everyone else you’ll meet will share their observations about you. Don’t try to over impress someone, just be natural.

#7 Dress Right

Don’t be too flashy or tacky and absolutely stay away from vibrant colors like bright shades of yellow or green. Make sure your interview outfit is appropriate to match the office culture and use the guidelines in the interview letter. If no dress code is mentioned, mail the concerned person and cross-check, not only will they be glad but you’ll get brownie points for professionalism and awareness.

 

Implement these hacks & come back and share your interview stories with us!