Finding a new job in a depressed job market is incredibly tough, but what is more stressful and challenging is taking a final call when it comes to a career switch. However, with a little bit of strategic planning, you can make the entire process productive and successfully make a career transition irrespective of where you currently stand in your job and career. 

It is seen that people who are most likely to make a career change are mid-way in their careers and are tired or burned out yearning for something new and challenging to do. 

Changing Job Vs Changing Career

It is often observed that most people confuse changing jobs with changing careers. This is a fallacy as there is a vast difference between the two. Changing jobs is defined as opting for the same type of job although with a different employer. For example, you may be working as an engineer in a firm XYZ Corp and then you decide to move to a firm ABC Corp in a similar position. It is a simple process that does not consume a lot of time or require deep strategic planning. 

Changing careers is a different ball game as it involves opting for a job or position that is completely unrelated to your previous line of work. For example, you are a lawyer and then you make a decision to become a writer. A prime example of it could be American bestselling writer John Grisham who after graduating from law school in 1981 went on to practice law for nearly a decade before switching her career and becoming a full-time writer, churning out top-selling legal thrillers one after the other. 

A career change could often involve starting from scratch, obtaining additional education, or starting at a lower level. All this requires an extra bit of good luck, perseverance, determination, and hard work, which is why a lot of people are hesitant to make a career switch despite the monotony and dullness of their current profession. 

Are you ready to take the plunge?

It’s very easy to get influenced by the preconceived notion that after working for so many years in the same profession, it could be next to impossible to successfully transition to a new career. The important thing to understand is that you just need to convince yourself that you are ready to do it and more importantly are fully capable of doing it.

Signs that it’s time to seriously consider a career change 

In some cases, people are not even aware of the fact that it’s high time they start thinking about a career change. They could just suffer from a feeling of boredom and ennui and the very thought of following the mundane routine sends them into depression. 

Another telltale sign of your work killing you with boredom is that the very thought of going to work fills you with dread and you try every excuse you can think of to skip work.

Even worse, you are so dismayed by the idea of going to work that you would rather be anywhere else than at work. This can happen to anyone and at any stage of the career.  When such warning signs, occurring intermittently, become more and more frequent, prudence demands that you seriously start thinking about changing tracks. 

Are you complaining about work all the time? You have come to hate your job so much that nothing seems to excite you anymore. You want to hit the exit button as soon as possible despite a good salary or the organization you are working for. 

Are you experiencing signs of anxiety, worry, and stress which you find hard to attribute to any other cause other than your job? 

Has your job become boring to an extent that you have simply stopped bothering about accomplishing any challenging task or trying to learn something new or exciting? You just sit there in your office waiting for the day to get over. 

Has your job been the same for what seems like an eternity? If you are no longer interested in setting goals or caring about professional development, then for all intents and purposes your present career may have run its course. 

Conclusion

If you are performing poorly, not able to focus on tasks, feel tired, and distressed and try every excuse in the book to skip work, it’s probably the time to seriously start thinking about finding creative satisfaction in another field of activity. After all, it is easier to try your hand at something new to rekindle that lost spark rather than performing poorly in your current job and bear the stigma of being fired.